The Glass Recycling Problem: What’s Behind It, and What to do


Glass may be recycled indefinitely without losing its quality. Recycling glass offers several demonstrated environmental benefits, including reduced emissions, energy savings, and raw material use. Recycling the material is also popular because it is a common home component. According to the Glass Recycling Coalition, 93 percent of homeowners and customers expect to be able to recycle glass. So, why are certain markets no longer accepting glass for recycling?


The causes for this are numerous. Here's a rundown of the problem and what businesses and governments can do to solve it and perhaps save money on garbage disposal.



Glass may be recycled indefinitely without losing its quality.


Recycling glass offers several demonstrated environmental benefits, including reduced emissions, energy savings, and raw material use. Recycling the material is also popular because it is a common home component. According to the Glass Recycling Coalition, 93 percent of homeowners and customers expect to be able to recycle glass. So, why are certain markets no longer accepting glass for recycling?


The causes for this are numerous. Here's a rundown of the problem and what businesses and governments can do to solve it and perhaps save money on garbage disposal.


Glass may be quite dangerous.

Broken glass is a safety problem for employees, but it may also cause damage to recycling machinery. As a result, glass processing prices are rising.



Sorting broken glass is challenging.

To make high-quality glass bottles and jars, most manufacturers require recyclable glass to be sorted by color. When glass is fractured, it is difficult to sift, and if broken down too finely, it might be difficult to reprocess. When glass separation is too difficult or expensive, recyclers discharge the entire stream to the dump.


Glass is rather heavy.

Transporting glass is difficult and costly. Because of the expensive expense of glass, some towns are paying to have it properly crushed for use in building. While this is an excellent application for glass, it is not always the finest.



The glass market has evolved.

In the 1980s, mandatory glass recycling initiatives saturated the market with recyclable glass, lowering prices. Glass has been replaced by aluminum and plastic in several items during the previous two decades, resulting in lower demand.


What should companies do?

1) Buy less glass, particularly for single-use goods, and reuse whenever feasible.


2) Consider other options. The growth of the craft beer business implies more draft and canned beer for restaurants and beverage merchants (and fewer glass bottles). In recent years, aluminum bottles have grown increasingly popular among beer drinkers. Wine remains challenging since there are fewer alternatives for wine on tap and in cans, but this is anticipated to improve.


3) Look for manufacturer/retail take-back programs that don't leave your store with the bag on the glass.


4) Keep the glass apart from the rest of the stream. If your firm creates a lot of glass and you can work with a glass hauler, this is a terrific option. In general, it is never a bad idea to separate any single item for recycling at the point of origination.


The Bridge City Glass Difference

At Bridge City Glass, every glazier makes sure to install and use glas to the minimum of residuals. We are professionals and understand just how important it is to recycle and use glass. If you are looking for an all in one glass installation and repair in Portland Oregon, feel free to give us a call today!


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